Tagged: photos of gay men

Reinier, Graphic Designer, Panama City

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

Reiner, in his own words: “I used to think being gay, meant about rejections from the people you love, about the body, about parties, about sex and I was really scare about it but now I know that being gay its much bigger than that, it’s about being who you are no matter what, it’s about to loving yourself and always be proud.

Coming out for me was really easy and I’m very lucky I have the must wonderfull mother I can ever ask for, and I thought will be harder then that because I was comparing with my other friends experiences and I told her because I was in a relationship, I was traveling all the time and I was sick of so many lies, so I decided to make her part of my life and was a very emotional momment.

I was really scared and with my brother there to support me and I told her and she was like “so? what you expect me to do? You’re my son I have to love you no matter what” and she started to cry when she was talking, then my brother was crying too, and she hug me and told me “no matter what I will be here for you, because I love you and I am proud of you” and the very next day she was treating me like always just like my brothers, my dad and my friends when I came out with them.

So my story doesn’t have drama or hate and that’s why I feel lucky and proud to be gay. When it’s about to be gay in Panama its kind of hard because there is a lot of gossips and jealousy in this country, that’s why I refuse to let those with dirty feet walk through my mind, and just be happy.”

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

Antoine, Project Manager, Paris

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

Antoine, in his own French words: “Etre gay signifie pour moi être une personne ayant une forte sensibilité et partageant les émotions de manière sincère et profonde avec leurs amis. Cela fait référence à un style de vie bien à part comparé à des couples hétérosexuels dans la mesure où les gays ont tendance à fréquenter des personnes de leur « milieu », même si ce n’est pas une généralité. Etre gay est aussi synonyme d’affirmation de son goût pour l’art, quel que soit le domaine (architecture, artiste, peinture, mode). En général, les gays sont altruistes et cherchent à rendre heureux les personnes dans la nécessité. Ils sont aussi engagés dans les causes qui leur tiennent à cœur.

En tant que gay, j’ai parfois dû me justifier sur ma sensibilité démesurée. Derrière la « carapace » que je me suis forgée au fur et à mesure des années pour me protéger des insinuations ou provocations se trame une très grande sensibilité que je dévoile qu’aux personnes très proches ou dont le parcours m’interpelle.
Aux yeux de certains, cette hyper-sensibilité ainsi que mon goût prononcé pour les belles choses peut les interroger sur mes orientations sexuelles.

A mes yeux, le quartier gay de Paris est plutôt restreint puisqu’il se cantonne au Marais. Il est très fréquent de croiser des visages connus lorsque l’on s’y rend. Comme dans toutes les autres villes, ce quartier est plutôt superficiel mais il est toujours agréable de s’y promener afin d’observer les différents styles des personnes arpentant les rues du quartier.
Saint-Germain des Prés -moins superficiel et plus cultivé- est un autre lieu où les gays peuvent se balader en prenant du plaisir.

Mon coming-out s’est fait très simplement ! Alors que je demandais à mes parents si mon copain de l’époque pouvait venir en vacances avec ma famille, ma mère m’a interpellé en me demandant s’il s’agissait de mon petit-ami. J’ai alors répondu « Oui », et ma famille l’a très bien reçu en me soutenant dans mes choix et en considérant que le principal était d’être heureux et d’avoir trouvé son équilibre !”

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

David, Actor/Fight-Director/Musician, New York City

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

David, in his own words “Being gay is a great blessing. I feel that gay men are forced to confront their shadows at an early age and in ways that straight men, by and large don’t have to. We have to scrutinize our very identity as men and learn what that means to be ourselves. It’s a very personal journey of self-realization, self-acceptance and self-actualization. It can be daunting, heart-breaking, frightening, exciting, astonishing and deeply spiritual.

My journey was not easy. I didn’t come out to myself till I was in my mid-twenties and then to my parents in my late 20s. I had suppressed my gay nature all through adolescence and college; keeping my eye on the prize of making myself into an actor and theater artist. It was that very choice of vocation that forced me to be honest with myself and come out. I knew that I’d never be any good as an actor if I couldn’t be first honest with myself. An actor must be relentless in their quest for truth about the human condition and how to accurately tell it’s story.

Ironically, I never have been cast in a gay role for film or tv. I’m told I don’t “read” gay with my stocky build, and baritone voice. Luckily the stage has been more generous and allowed me to play some great gay characters.

Since then, I’ve worked hard to build bridges with many of NYC’s gay theater artists and have helped found a new Queer theater company: {Your Name Here} A Queer Theater Company. I also worked frequently as a fight-choreographer for off-broadway and indie-film. As far as I know, I’m the only “out” gay fight-director and like to think that I’m helping break stereotypes about gay men.

Other aspects of my nature worked against my easy integration into the gay community of NYC at first. I like martial arts and was a regular on the amateur tournament circuit. I enjoy rock /punk/psycho-billy music and the out-doors. I have found some acceptance in the leather and gay-pagan communities and have cultivated a wonderful circle of queer friends. “