Tagged: coming out stories

Safir, HIV Technical Expert, Bangkok, Thailand

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
Safir, in his own words: “Being a 26 years old gay to me means: 20 years living in fear that I would end up in hell and while I was still on earth, I would be #foreveralone because of being brainwashed that God would only give a man a female soulmate (thanks to my conservative Muslim upbringing, including nine years studying in Islamic school) followed by 2 years learning that I’m not alone and not everyone/everything condemns homosexuality (thanks to a new life in Europe that I pursued while I was studying) followed by 5 years feeling awesome to be what I am (as my life here in Bangkok for the past few years is free from stigma and surrounded by open-minded people).

My successes was when I got in to the United Nations. I started as an intern two years ago and now I still cant believe that I’ve really been working with them ever since. I came from a very local uni and I was competing with kids from elite universities around the globe. Heck, I didn’t even know if I took the right master Programme prior to my internship. I do still have some insecurities with my English while working with the colleagues who are native speakers. But that’s great. I mean, that’s the only insecurity I have now and I no longer have insecurities of my sexual orientation in the office. It’s very different when I worked in an Indonesian company. I kept fearing that they would’ve bullied me if I was open about being gay.

What’s also great about my work at the UN is that, as a HIV technical expert, I’m working for the human rights of people living with HIV and key affected populations, including gay men, which is something I’ve been passionate about since I grew up. Growing up in a non-gay friendly environment really does unleash my human rights advocate side.

I haven’t come out to my parents yet – but I’ve done it to my Facebook friends. I was in IKEA with friends, they took a pic of me coming out of the showcased wardrobe and I posted that pic on my Facebook (with the caption:” just coming out of the closet”). Bam!

(With regards to the gay scene in Bangkok) This is a tricky question. I am already hearing somebody shouting at me because my answer is stereotyping the gay scene. I find the gay scene in Bangkok, in terms of nightlife, divided into two neighwhorehood: “sticky rice” AND “potato and rice” gayhoods. Or maybe not so much on what kind of race you’re into with, but more on ‘whether or not you speak Thai.” Sticky rice playground is what people refer to “local gayhood” (e.g., Ratchada, Ramkanhaeng) – where finding English-speaking Thai boys is much harder than in the ‘international’ one (e.g., Silom). I eat all kind of carbo, but I prefer the “Sticky rice” playground to the other. I can still feel the Thai’s land-of-smile manners there. no matter how packed the club is, the boys will still say “sorry” (in a very polite Thai expression) if they bump you or step on your feet.

Outside the nightlife scene, I feel that there’s no other exclusive gay scene in Bangkok. Most of the “scenes” are integrated with the non-gay ones. This just shows how Bangkok is much more progressive than other big cities in Southeast Asia.

(Advice I’d give to my younger self) You might still not have Grindr (or a Smartphone), but you are not alone. Gay people exist. Not just in the porn videos you secretly hid in the folder named “Homeworks” in your old PC. And the best part is, many of them are beautiful and full of inspiration, and they love you they way you are.”

Howard, Teacher, Philadelphia

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

Howard, in his own words: “Being gay is about being different. It leads to a gradual process of accepting who you are, accepting that you are different, accepting that some people will hate you and even abandon you, and finally, for me, realizing that the process of self-acceptance gives me strength, opens my creativity and helps form the strength of my character. My coming-out story took 67 years.

Years of self-loathing and feeling less significant than others have only recently given way to feelings of pride and self-accomplishment. I do not want younger people to have to undergo this journey — today many younger people do not have to struggle as much — but there are still many who have to bear the weight of the burden culture and religion place on us.

Being gay has made me self-aware, and self-reliant, able to tap into my creative juices and only recently to feel okay about whom I am. Even 40 years ago, Philadelphia had wonderful resources for gay men and women. When I was first dealing with my sexual awareness I found a gay synagogue, gay support groups, the Advocate experience (a form of Zen popular in the 60’s,) gay counseling center, and simply being around other gay men to be of help, but the inner burden was always there, always heavy, despite several forms of self-help and therapy.

I didn’t want to be gay, didn’t want to be different and tried to hide it from myself and from others. I got married for the wrong reasons, had children whom I love but feel I let-down as a symbol of strength. I tried to follow the “normal” path until at 30 years of age decided to seek out who I really was. I found friends and dated many men while trying to find people who would make me feel whole, realizing on some level that the emptiness was inside me, but not knowing how to fill it. The life experiences that should have made me feel positive seemed to in vain — always wanting to “fit in” and yet feeling very much estranged by at people at work, neighbors and acquaintances who I coveted as friends.

My creativity felt like a burden, my interests seemed frivolous and uninteresting by my standards of what “real men” should be. Even as I met other gay men who shared some of these interests my self-esteem lacked true conviction. I looked, always, for self-acceptance through others. I searched for “love” that would make me complete, but I have never truly loved — myself, or someone else. Now, the need to find intimacy is no longer seen as a magic cure-all; I can find that strength inside.

Part of my recent level of comfort is the result of seeing the development my gay son’s now ten-year relationship and the adaptations they have made to accommodate each other. I am proud of his accomplishment. Yes, you can learn from your children. Those without children can learn from a younger generation that is more accepting.

I have semi-retired, live in the city, have developed a circle of supportive friends, and can say for the first time that I feel complete. I love my varied interests, love my time alone, and seek more friends, more experiences, and an even wider variety of interests. This is truly the first time in my life that I feel proud of myself, the first time in my life that I feel my differences are my strengths, the first time in my life I can say I truly feel inner-joy.

If I had it to do over again, and as advice for younger people – do not do as I did, find your inner voice. Live and work among other gay people, or in a community that is accepting. Fill your life with experiences, visit places you want to visit, do things you enjoy, indulge yourself without guilt, and do whatever it takes to love yourself first. Caution: this is easier said than done.”

 

Paransuri, Creative Director, Bangkok, Thailand

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
Parunsiri, in his own words: ” เกย์คือธรรมชาติหนึ่งในจักรวาล เกย์เป็นอะไรที่เติมเต็มช่องว่างระหว่างชายและหญิง เติมเต็มระหว่างซ้ายกับขวา เติมเต็มระหว่างดำกับขาว เติมเต็มระหว่างกลางวันและกลางคืน เติมเต็มระหว่างความสุขและความเศร้า ไม่ให้ช่องว่างนั้นว่างเปล่า

เกย์เป็นธรรมชาติที่มีพลังพิเศษที่ทำให้โลกใบนี้สนุกขึ้น มีพลังพิเศษที่ทำให้โลกใบนี้มีสีสันขึ้น เป็นเพศที่มีจินตนาการที่เหนือจินตนาการ ที่ใครต่อใครคาดไม่ถึงเสมอๆ เป็นเพศพิเศษ ที่ทำให้ส่วนที่ขาดๆ เกินๆ บนโลกใบนี้ เป็นส่วนที่ขาดๆ เกินๆ ที่พอดี สมบูรณ์ และลงตัว มีเพื่อนผู้หญิงคนหนึ่งเคยบอกไว้ว่า เกย์ มักจะเป็นเพศ ที่สะอาด ฉลาด ตลก ซึ่งเท่าที่รู้จักเพื่อนเกย์ด้วยกันมาก็เป็นแบบนั้นจริงๆ

มีความสุขที่ได้ใช้ชีวิต ในแบบที่เราเป็น ไม่ว่าคุณจะทำงาน ดำเนินชีวิต พักผ่อน จะกิน จะเที่ยว จะเล่น จะนอนหลับ จะตื่นขึ้นมา จะเจ็บป่วยหรือไม่สบาย จะแข็งแรง จะอ่อนแอ จะลำบาก จะประสบความสาเร็จ จะล้มลง จะลุกขึ้นยืน หรือเดินต่อไป ชีวิตก็มีความสุขในแบบที่เราเป็นในทุกก้าว ไม่ต้องปกปิด ไม่ต้องแอบซ่อน ยอมรับตัวเอง และ ทุกคนยอมจะรับในตัวเรา นั่นแหละคือความสำเร็จของการใช้ชีวิต

ถ้าเปิดเผยว่าเป็นเกย์ ให้ทุกคนได้ทราบ น่าจะเป็นช่วงจบมหาวิทยาลัย และเริ่มเข้าทำงานในบริษัทใหม่ๆ ไม่ได้บอกใครด้วยคำพูด แต่ยอมรับตัวเองและเป็นตัวเอง เพื่อนๆ รอบข้างก็รู้และยอมรับ ไม่แน่นะ พวกเพื่อนก็รู้ตั้งแต่แรกอยู่แล้วก็ได้ สำหรับครอบครัวถึงแม้ว่า จะไม่ได้เปิดเผยกับทุกคนว่าเราเป็นอะไร ไม่เคยแม้แต่จะพูดบอกกับทุกคนในครอบครัวถึงเรื่องนี้ เชื่อว่าคนเป็นพ่อเป็นแม่เค้ารู้และยอมรับเราตั้งแต่เด็ก ตั้งแต่ยังไร้เดียงสา ตั้งแต่เราไม่รู้อะไรคือเกย์เลยด้วยซ้ำ

ด้วยสถานภาพทางสังคมของแต่ละคนไม่เหมือนกัน มันอาจจะยากที่จะเปิดเผยตัวเอง เกย์อาจจะเป็นความลับที่บอกใครไม่ได้ตลอดชีวิตนี้ อาจจะเป็นความลับที่อยู่กับเราเพียงคนเดียวตลอดไป แต่มันไม่สำคัญ

เพราะไม่ว่าเราจะเปิดเผยตัวเองกับใคร ก็ไม่เท่า การเปิดใจยอมรับตัวเอง มันยิ่งใหญ่และมีคุณค่ายิ่งกว่าการเปิดเผยให้โลกรู้ด้วยซ้ำ

เกย์ในกรุงเทพมีหลายกลุ่ม หลายสไตล์มาก มีทั้งกลุ่มเกย์ที่ชอบออกกำลังตามฟิตเนส หรือ สปอร์ตคลับ เกย์ที่ชอบปาร์ตี้ ชอบเที่ยวกลางคืนไม่ว่าจะเป็นสีลม ซอย 2 หรือ ย่านอตก หรืออีกกลุ่มจะชอบเที่ยวย่านรัชดา หรือ ชอบที่เที่ยวย่านลำสาลี ยังมีกลุ่มเกย์ที่ชอบท่องเที่ยวต่างประเทศ กลุ่มเกย์ที่ชอบเข้าวัดฟังธรรมเจริญกุศลในพระพุทธศาสนา กลุ่มเกย์ที่ชอบทำงาน กลุ่มเกย์ที่ชอบหาอะไรอร่อยๆกินกัน และยังมีกลุ่มเกย์ที่ชอบแฟชั่นชอบแต่งตัว ก็คงเหมือนกลุ่มเกย์ทั่วโลกที่มีหลากหลายสไตล์ และก็ยังมีกลุ่มเกย์ที่ชอบเล่น JACK D, GRINDER หรือ TINDER เพื่อหาเพื่อนในโลกออน์ไลน์ แต่ส่วนใหญ่ก็จะเป็นความสัมพันธ์ระยะสั้น ก็แล้วแต่ว่าจะมีไลฟ์สไตล์แบบไหน ซึ่งบางทีคือวันศุกร์อาจจะเที่ยวเมาเละ แต่ รุ่งเช้า ก็เข้าวัดฟังธรรมก็เป็นได้

ถ้าชาติหน้ามีจริง ก็อยากเกิดมามีความสุข แบบชาตินี้อีก มันไม่สำคัญว่าจะเป็นเกย์หรือไม่ ขอให้เป็นอะไรก็ได้ แล้วมีความสุข… ดีใจและภูมิใจ ที่ชาตินี้ได้เป็นเกย์ และใช้ชีวิตในแบบที่เกย์เป็น เหมือนสโลแกนสินค้าในโฆษณาของไทย “ชีวิตของเราใช้ซะ” เอามาดัดแปลงเป็น “ชีวิตของเกย์ใช้ซะ” Ha Ha Ha”

In English:

” My female friend used to tell me once that a gay guy is clean, smart, and funny. I think she is right! Being a gay guy closes the gap between man and woman. Being a gay guy allows me to understand better ends of the spectrum like filling in the empty of space between left and right, and black and white. Because of this, I think being gay makes you special, we can be imaginative and make the world more fun. So, being what we are means filling in the missing parts of the human universe.

I don’t conceal my identity. I enjoy working, vacationing, eating, playing, and sleeping. No matter whether I’m healthy or sick, I’m successful or unsuccessful, I’m rising or falling, I’m happy in every step I make. The fact that I accept my identity, makes others accept me. I believe that daring to accept the truth is a life success. I’m very happy in the way I am.

I first told others that I’m gay when I graduated from college but I’ve never told my parents and my colleagues about my hidden identity. I know that I can’t keep my identity as a secret for the rest of my life. However, I believe that the fact that I admit that I’m gay is much more important than disclosing it to the world.

Gay men in Bangkok enjoy shopping, partying, traveling, making merits, fashion, and social networking (like JackD, Grinder, and Tinder). For example, you can find gay men hanging out around Silom Soi 2, Ratchada, Or-To-Ko, or Lumsalee.

If a next life exists, I want it to be as happy as this life. I don’t care if I will be gay in the next life, I only want my life to be happy. For the present life, I’m very happy and proud to be gay. My life motto is “Live gay life to the fullest”. Actually, it’s similar to one commercial tag line “Live your life to the fullest.”