Category: City: São Paulo, Brazil

Miro and Filipe, Art Editor and Account Executive, São Paulo

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

Miro, in his own words: “(Being gay means)Only a sexual orientation.

Apenas uma orientação sexual.

I had the challenge of facing bullying in adolescence and success to overcome this without trauma.

Tive o desafio de enfrentar bullying na adolescência e o sucesso de superar isto sem traumas.

There are several communities in São Paulo. Mine is quite homely and friendly.

Existem várias comunidades em São Paulo. A minha é bem caseira e amigável.

(Coming out) was easy. I always had very special friends and family.

Foi fácil. Sempre tive amigos e família muito especiais.

(If I could give myself advice before coming out I would say) Come out of the closet as soon as possible, because everyone around you already knows that you are gay.

Saia do armário o mais cedo possível, pois todo mundo ao seu redor já sabe que você é gay.”

Filipe, in his own words: “(Being gay means) Freedom. In the very beginning may not be easy. But accept that and respect youself first of all, is the most important to be happy.

Liberdade. No inicio pode não parecer fácil, mas aceitar isso e se respeitar, em primeiro lugar, é o mais importante pra ser feliz.

There was no challenge about being gay, besides the normal life. But my greatest success was the acceptance of my family and friends and to have found love so early, I hope to take to the end of life.

Não houve nenhum desafio em relação a ser gay, além dos normais da vida. Mas meu maior sucesso foi a aceitação da minha família e amigos e ter encontrado o amor tão cedo, que eu espero poder aproveitar até o fim da vida.

(The gay scene in São Paulo is) Varied to extremes, we have bars and parties for all types from bears to dragqueens.

Diversificada ao extremo, temos bares e festas para todos os tipos, de ursos a dragqueens.

In the beginning (coming out) was very difficult, you do not want to hurt people who are nearby and apparently it’s easier to keep up appearances and stay with people of the opposite sex, but it is not, and you are always under immense pressure, and when you say is such a relief, the next minute you’re light and happy with yourself. Everything was so perfect, the fourth guy I kissed became the man of my life … I do not think would do differently.

No inicio é bem difícil, você não quer magoar as pessoas que estão próximas e aparentemente, é mais fácil manter as aparências e ficar com pessoas do sexo oposto, mas não é, e você fica sempre sob uma pressão imensa, e quando você conta é um alívio infinito, no minuto seguinte você está leve e feliz com você mesmo. Tudo foi tão perfeito e o quarto cara que eu beijei se tornou o homem da minha vida… acho que não faria diferente.”

Edu, Quality Assurance Test Leader, São Paulo

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

Edu, in his own words: “I think being gay is just a part of my personality but it is not the main thing about me. I think either gay or straight I would be looking for the same things. You know, I’m a human being who wants to be loved, to grow, to experiment things and so on.
On one hand there is the prejudice explicit or implicit, depending on the culture/city/country you are in, but on the other hand you are free to build your own path in life. You don’t have to necessarily follow the steps the society pre-programmed for you, like to marry, to have kids and to buy a flat in the suburbs. You can choose being single, having an open marriage, spending your money traveling the world because you don’t have kids, or whatever you want to. I notice that many people are afraid of this freedom; they prefer living in the box. For me I see it as a blank canvas I’m free to paint as I please.

My biggest challenge was to go through the bulling I suffered during school time. Bullying is a topic that is much discussed these days, but back in the 80’s it was really complicated to be a shy/nerdy/gay kid. One interesting thing is that I was bullied for being gay before I understand what sexuality was all about or even actually having a sex drive.

My biggest success was to overcome a very limited scenario in which I was born and raised. I was born in a poor family in the suburbs with all its financial difficulties. My parents and grandparents helped me out as much as possible for me to study and to grow as a decent person. I took all chances and I was the first on my family to go to college and have “a real big job”. I am grateful to all of them.

I could define São Paulo gay community in one word: diversity. You can find here the princesses (in Brazil they call them Barbies), bears, indies, hipsters and so on. I find it refreshing because I come from a city in which the only gay archetype that is acceptable it the buffed-all-waxed-suntan-lined-porn-star-look-a-like guy.

Getting out of the closet was complicated just in my head. Once I figured it out and accepted it was all natural. I didn’t have “the conversation” with my mother; my family knew it all along.

(If I could give myself advice before coming out) I would say to myself: “relax and go ahead. It won’t hurt and once you are out they will respect you more than being in the closet.”

Andre and Rodrigo, VJ/Designer and Creative Planner/Content Creator, São Paulo

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by  Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

Rodrigo, in his own words: “I’ve lived with my grandmother and my brother for the past 5 years. And her acceptance towards me and my brother being gay is something that shocked me at first. She was born almost 70 years ago, in a totally different world, and acts like every person should about us: naturally. It taught me that the ones that love you the most understand (or will at one point) that being gay is just one small part of who you are. And it doesn’t really change anything.

She says that in life, love is what matters the most. And I’d like to add something to that: learning.

Learning to accept yourself.
Learning that you’re different, and that it’s fine to be yourself.
Learning about who you are as a person.
Actually, if you think about it, learning also takes love and passion.
So yeah, she’s right!:)

Also, I know there is still prejudice in the world, even here in Brazil, and that’s why I define myself as a lucky gay man for having people around me who accept who I am, and a boyfriend who I can freely love. I hope I get to see this reality for all gay men in the world.”

“Imagine all the people living life in peace
You, you may say
I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one
I hope some day you’ll join us
And the world will be as one”
John Lennon

Andre, in his own words: “Being gay means being free. Each person must find his way of freedom.

Coming out was much easier than I thought. The biggest difficulties came from myself and not from people around me.”

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong