Nacho and Alvarito, Buenos Aires, Argentina

photo by Kevin Truong
Nacho (left) and Alvarito (right)photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
Nacho, in his own words: “En realidad ser gay para mí, es ser lo que quiero ser. Tiene que ver con mi identidad. Creo que cada uno debe ser digno en lo que es y en lo que quiere ser. En ese punto es donde ser gay se transforma en un campo de lucha para mí. De activismo. De derechos.

Soy una persona que trabaja con la imagen. Cuando en nuestro país se sancionaba la Ley de Identidad de Género en el año 2012, me sentí con la necesidad de hacer algo, de aportar desde lo artístico mi granito de arena. Así surge un proyecto personal que titulé “Magnolias” (flor que simboliza la perseverancia y la dignidad) y que retrata a doce feminidades “trans”, dejando de lado los estereotipos y estigmas socialmente impuestos, y vinculándome desde el amor y el respeto. Poder dar a luz, transitar y finalizar este proyecto fue algo hermoso, que me permitió conocer personas maravillosas, y conectarme con mi lado más humano.

(Coming out) Al principio fue bastante difícil. Al pertenecer a una colectividad (japonesa) donde mucha gente se conoce entre sí, el gran problema para mis padres era el “¿qué van a pensar los demás?”. Tuve que lidiar con ese “karma” durante muchos años. No se habló más del tema. Preferí la invisibilización dentro de mi casa a enfrentarlos. Luego de un tiempo, decidí romper el silencio y dialogar. Y fue algo grandioso. Ahí me di cuenta lo importante que es perder el miedo y hablar las cosas.

La comunidad LGBTI en Argentina, es una comunidad luchadora. Que lucha por sus derechos, que sale a las calles, que se hace escuchar. Creo que si bien aún la discriminación está presente, en materia legal se avanzó muchísimo en los últimos años, gracias al activismo.

A mi yo más joven, le tengo mucho cariño. Creo que fue un luchador e hizo lo mejor que pudo, para que yo hoy esté aquí plantado a mis 34 años, con una ideología, y un espíritu de lucha y de derechos.”

In English:

“Actually, being gay to me, is to be what I wanna be. It has to do with my identity. I think everyone should be worth what it is he or she wants to be. This is the point at which being gay becomes a battlefield for me. Activism. Rights.

I am a person who works with the image. When the Gender Identity Law in 2012 was sanctioned in this country, I felt the need to do something, from the arts to contribute my grain of sand. So I did a personal project titled “Magnolias” (flower that symbolizes perseverance and dignity) and twelve portraying femininity “trans, leaving aside the stereotypes and socially imposed stigmas, and linking to me the love and respect that arises. To give birth, transit and end this project was something beautiful, which allowed me to meet wonderful people, and connect with my human side.

At first (coming out) was quite difficult. Belonging to a (Japanese) community where many people know each other, the big problem for my parents was “what will the others think?”. I dealt with that “karma” for many years. There was no talk anymore. I preferred to be invisible inside my house rather than to confront them. After a while, I decided to break the silence and talk. And it was something great. Then I realized how important it is to lose the fear and talk things out.

The LGBTI community in Argentina, is a struggling community. Fighting for their rights, which hits the streets, it is heard. I think that although discrimination is still present, in legal terms there is much progress in recent years, thanks to activism.

For my younger self, I have much affection. I think I was a fighter and did the best I could for myself to be here today planted at 34 years with an ideology and a spirit for struggle and rights.”

Alvarito, in his own words: “Being gay does not mean anything in particular to me other than being part of a social segment of people who experience sexual desires for someone of his/her same sex.

I do believe that being part to this group which is somehow always fighting for LGBT rights has allowed me to be in touch with wonderful values that have become part of who I am.

Becoming acquainted with different people, prejudice aside, has been both a great challenge and an accomplishment. These people have helped me to grow and to be become a better person. I am a good judge of character! I’m still in the search for news things so, there are plenty of challenges ahead of me.

When I was an innocent child I thought I would never share my secret but when I become a teenager I felt the urge to experience who I really was.

When I was eighteen, I wrote a letter to my parents telling them how I felt with the help of a cousin of mine with whom I had a great relationship. I left them the letter for my parents to discover when I went or holidays to my uncle’s house on the coast. When I returned from my holidays, my parents and I had a talk about my letter. Fortunately, They took the news very well and they have always been very supportive so far.

(The gay community in Buenos Aires) is a social sector which is brave and always struggling. Luckily, at this political moment in Argentina, the fruits of this fight are beginning to be born in spite of the generally Catholic sectors that have always opposed this struggle.

Anyway, even within the LGBT group there are diverse voices whom have opposite interests an times.

I believe the best advice someone could be give is that the most important thing in life is to work towards being in touch with oneself, with the essence of who one is. It is from here that any situation that may come up can be faced and dealt with. Honesty always pays. Being honest is the best way to live.”

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