Markus, Student, Lucerne, Switzerland

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
Markus, in his own words: “Today, being gay means the same to me as having blue eyes. So there’s nothing special about it, I’m just born this way.

Challenges: to know what I want to work, saying: “I’m gay”, moving from Berne to Lucerne, dealing with a narcissistic boyfriend. Successes: finding great friends to live with, having the best people in my life, saying: “I’m gay”, working in a psychiatry, being happy.

I’ve always known I’m gay but didn’t tell anyone, because I was too young. With 12 I heard it’s not normal being gay, so I definitely didn’t tell anybody. With 19 I understood what it’s about to be gay and that I’m not the only one in this world. That’s the reason I came out to my family and my friends. Everything went alright! Short story to tell, but it was a long way to go!

(With regards the LGBTQ community in Lucerne) I don’t know it. I’m not much of a community-guy.

(Advice to my younger self) Don’t worry.”

One comment

  1. mike plambeck

    We all hope that in time young children will not be influenced to think that being gay is abnormal.I feel the learning process is changing. I hope it is changing, but know that it will take time.

Leave a Reply