Han, Marketing Director, New York City

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
Photo by Kevin Truong
Photo by Kevin Truong

Han, in his own words: “For me, being gay, especially in this generation, has a very specific meaning. I have to constantly remind myself that the only reason why I am able to walk down 9th avenue holding my boyfriend’s hand is because of those who came before me, the gay men who fought the fight in hopes that one day, other gay men can show affection in public without being worried that they might get arrested or beaten up. Most NYC gay men in my generation do not have to deal with any of that. We don’t need fag hags standing next to us at clubs. We don’t need to have sex in secret worrying that if we were caught, our pictures would be all over the news. So for me, being a gay man living in New York City, it’s a balance of understanding where we came from and appreciating those who came before us, but also enjoying what we are able to have and remembering that we are the ones now that have to continue this fight and this march so that hopefully the generation after ours will have even less to worry about.

For a long time, I resented being a gay man in this generation. When I first started learning about the gay culture in the 60’s and the 70’s, I felt incredibly out of place. I felt like I had missed out on the “gay golden years”, missed out on the sexual revolution, the riots… I mean it was the height of the gay liberation movement, and it felt like I had missed out on an important experience as a gay activist. I wanted to be there leading the march, fighting the police, cruising the west side piers…. Then one day, I was having this conversation with a good friend of mine, and she reminded me that despite how meaningful and glorious I think those years might have been, I have to remember that it was incredibly difficult being a gay man, far more than it is today. She reminded me that those men fought for my rights, fought hard so that one day people like me didn’t have to go through what they had to go through. Larry Kramer’s story wasn’t a play back then, it was reality. So sure, there are parts of gay culture that I wish I could’ve experienced, and that’s a shame, but some of it… we shouldn’t ever have to see again. And for that, I am grateful. The fight is far from being over, but the history that we get to write today is far less painful than it was 40 years ago. A lot of it is actually quite beautiful.

I would tell my younger self two things: 1. Get out there and love hard. 2. Stay away from tequila.”

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