Eric, Yoga Teacher and Student of the Universe, Washington D.C.

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

Eric, in his own words: “Fortunately, being gay has less and less of a stigma and is easier to negotiate. Ultimately, its just an identity, which is only a part of who a person is, and is by no means a true self.

My biggest triumph is that I’ve found a new family for myself. Growing up, people called me weird, gay, or both. Maybe I am weird. But that isn’t important. I found an an environment where my authentic nature is not antithetical to those around me. I can I be me every minute of my day.

(With regards to the gay community in D.C.) The irony is that so much of the civil rights movement and the philosophies driving racial integration are pushed out of Washington, DC. I’ve never seen segretation like I see it among gays in DC. Multiracial friendship groups are an anomoly, not the norm. That aside, conversations are always a wonderful back-and-forth of vapid (but fun) kiki-banter and educated, insightful discussions on politics and world events.

(With regards to coming out) My older brother knew I was into guys because we went to the same high school and freshman year I had a boyfriend for 13 days. When my brother flipped his brand new car on a straight road in the middle of the day, he got in trouble. When my parents confronted him about the mystery of his accident he outed me to take some of the heat off of himself.”

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