Chris and Brendan, Interior Designer and Digital Artist, Los Angeles

photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong
photo by Kevin Truong

Christopher, in his own words:I have always felt that since (being a gay man) is a challenge to the societal norm, that it was an opportunity to push myself further. I have always sought the same level of respect that my straight friends, colleagues and family members receive. For me its a quiet resistance. I set myself apart by doing well (in the ways that i can) and want to be respected for the quality of my character and not my sexual identity.”

Brendan, in his own words:Apart from political debates or social acceptance issues, I’ve always felt that being gay doesn’t automatically carry any meaning or weight to it. I don’t believe that being gay defines me on any level except for being attracted to other men. For many gay men, being gay becomes a lifestyle – culturally, behaviorally, everything. While I certainly understand and appreciate how much of an influence being gay can have on someone’s life, especially when that influence is positive, it’s never really had much of an influence on me. My day to day to life is the same as it would be if I were straight, bisexual, asexual, etc. The only difference is that at the end of the day, I look forward to spending time with someone who happens to be a man.”

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